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Upcoming Shows

THU, APR 16 (Cancelled)

Barry Sonnenfeld, Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Ruthie Foster, and more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

 

Barry Sonnenfeld is neurotic when it comes to making incredible films. The filmmaker and writer, who broke into the industry as the cinematographer on the Coen Brothers' first three films, was also the director of photography on Throw Mamma from the Train, Big, When Harry Met Sally, and Misery. He made his directorial debut with The Addams Family in 1991, and went on to direct a number of films including Addams Family Values, Get Shorty, and the first three Men in Black movies. His television credits include Pushing Daisies, for which he won an Emmy, and Netflix's A Series of Unfortunate Events. His new book, Barry Sonnenfeld, Call Your Mother: Memoirs of a Neurotic Filmmaker, is an outrageous and hilarious tale of traveling through life with the motto: Regret the Past. Fear the Present. Dread the Future. You’ve long seen life through Barry Sonnenfeld’s eyes on the screen – now take it in on the page.

Daniel Ortberg is a poetic yeller. As the cofounder of beloved literary humor site The Toast and the current dispenser of advice for Slate’s popular Dear Prudence column, Ortberg has been yelling on the internet for over a decade now – and people are listening. Ortberg is back with his new book Something That Will Shock and Discredit You. The witty and clever collection of essays and cultural observations spans pop culture – from the endearingly popular to the staggeringly obscure. Ortberg is also the New York Times bestselling author of Texts from Jane Eyre and The Merry Spinster.

Ruthie Foster has always undeniably marched to the beat of her own drum. From the small rural town of Gause, Texas, her vocal talent was elevated in worship services at her community church as she drew influence from legendary acts like Mavis Staples and Aretha Franklin. Along the way, Foster developed a unique sound unable to be contained within a single genre. She served in the Navy, walked away from a major recording deal when she felt it wouldn’t upload her individuality, and moved back to Texas to immerse herself in the Austin music scene. Described by Rolling Stone as “pure magic to watch and hear,” and nominated for Best Blues Album at the Grammy three times in a row, Foster is now on her sixth album – Joy Comes Back, which served as musical therapy for her as she split a household and custody of her child. Ruthie Foster’s mix of blues, folk, soul, rock, and gospel is undeniably hers, and she brings a whole lot more than a drum to the party.

THU, APR 30 (Cancelled)

Veronica Roth + Bonnie Tsui + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

Veronica Roth is taking the narrative of “the chosen one” and catapulting it into the future. In Chosen Ones, her first novel for adults, she upends the trope by following a group of five people… ten years after they saved the world as teenagers. Roth is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of the Divergent series, which has sold over 32 million copies worldwide. Her first foray into adult fiction makes it crystal clear why readers choose her work.

Bonnie Tsui’s new book will make your head swim – in a good way. Why We Swim has been called “a fascinating and beautifully written love letter to water” by Rebecca Skloot. In it, Tsui examines why humans are so drawn to water despite not being natural swimmers. A longtime contributor to the New York Times and California Sunday Magazine, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Press Foundation Fellowship. Her last book, American Chinatown: A People’s History of Five Neighborhoods, won the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature and was a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller. When she’s not writing, Tsui swims and surfs in the Bay Area.

THU, MAY 14 (Cancelled)

Sopan Deb + MAITA + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Sopan Deb has spun the pains and silences of family into heartbreaking yet humorous gold. In his new memoir Missed Connections: Meeting the Immigrant Parents Who Raised Me, Deb chronicles his literal and emotional journeys to reconnect with his father in India and his mother in New Jersey. Battling years of silence, Deb writes beautifully about the process of forgiveness, building bridges, and creating a new sort of family going forward. A writer for The New York Times as well as a standup comedian, Deb’s experience covering the Trump presidential campaign for CBS spurred him into wanting to reconnect with his family. He won an Edward R. Murrow award for a documentary he produced for The Boston Globe called Larger Than Life, which told the story about the NBA Hall of Famer Bill Russell’s complicated relationship with the city of Boston. Deb’s writing uses humor to crack open our hearts - and help us explore how to go forward with those we love most.

For Portland-based indie rock band MAITA, music is the free space where they can say what they want. Comprised of principal songwriter and front person Maria Maita-Keppeler, vocalist and guitarist Matthew Zeltzer, bassist Nevada Sowle, and keyboardist and percussionist Cooper Trail, MAITA’s debut album, “Best Wishes” will be released soon from venerated indie imprint Kill Rock Stars (Elliott Smith, Sleater-Kinney, the Decemberists). “Best Wishes” balances ethereal musicality with visceral expressiveness through the quartet’s arrangements and lyrics. Maita-Keppeler’s lyrics strike the balance of being layered and literate, but also impactfully concise. For playful, dynamic surf-rock that has something to say, open your ears to the debut album of MAITA.

THU, MAY 21 (Triple Door, Seattle)

Lulu Miller
Venue: The Triple Door, 216 Union St, Seattle
Doors: 6:00pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

Lulu Miller is a science writer, author, and co-founder of NPR's program Invisibilia, a series focused on the unseen forces that control human behavior. Prior to creating Invisibilia, Lulu produced WNYC'S Radiolab and served as a reporter on the NPR Science Desk. Miller’s wondrous debut book Why Fish Don't Exist seamlessly weaves biography, memoir, and the latest adventures in science, psychology, and philosophy. Taking us on an extraordinary journey, it highlights the life of 19th-century scientist David Starr Jordan in his pursuit to discover and record as many of the world’s fish as he possibly could. Miller's writing and reporting has been recognized by the George Foster Peabody Awards, Third Coast, and The Missouri Review.

THU, MAY 28

Phuc Tran, Stephanie Anne Johnson & the Hidogs + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Phuc Tran’s life has been shaped and saved by art. A high school Latin teacher for more than 20 years, he simultaneously established himself as a highly sought-after tattooer in the Northeast. His coming-of-age memoir Sigh, Gone is for anyone who’s ever felt like they didn’t belong. The book is an irreverent, funny, and moving tale of displacement and assimilation woven together with poignant themes from beloved works of classic literature. He currently tattoos at and owns Tsunami Tattoo in Portland, Maine, where he lives with his family. Tran’s new book vividly illustrates the essential role art and language can play in the journey of self-discovery.

Listening to Stephanie Anne Johnson sing is a truly captivating experience. The frontwoman for the Tacoma-based band The Hidogs can bring old-timers to tears, bring people to their feet, and wow the judges on the popular NBC series The Voice. Johnson’s music, after all, is rooted in all that’s American – which means expressing the pain of the past, the roots of the down-home, and the hope that hard work will lead to proper reward. She’s perfectly matched with The Hidogs, comprised of touching pedal steel player Dan Tyack, swinging drummer Ivan Gunderson, and pocket-perfect bassist Jesse Turcotte. The nimble quartet equal is parts capable of shaking the shingles off a rooftop as making any stage feel like a Sunday service. The group’s latest LP, Take This Love, is a blend of Loretta Lynn and Valerie June. Let yourself be affected by the surprise and satisfaction of Stephanie Anne Johnson and The Hidog’s singular sound.

THU, JUN 11

with Michael Arceneaux, John Craigie, + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Michael Arceneaux is a Houston-bred, Howard University-educated writer currently living in Harlem. Covering issues related to culture, sexuality, religion, race, and Beyoncé, Michael has written for Complex, Essence, The Guardian, New York Magazine, the New York Times, The Root, and many other publications. Additionally, he has lent his commentary to such outlets as MSNBC, NPR, SiriusXM, VH1, and Viceland. I Don’t Want to Die Poor (on sale April 7, 2020) is an unforgettable and relatable examination about what it’s like leading a life that often feels out of your control. But in Michael’s voice that’s “as joyful as he is shrewd” (BuzzFeed), these razor-sharp essays will still manage to make you laugh and remind you that you’re not alone in this often intimidating journey. Michael has never shied away from discussing his struggles with debt. In I Don’t Want to Die Poor he reveals the extent to which it has an impact on every facet of his life. It has had a huge influence on how he dates, how he seeks medical care, how he wrestles with the question of whether or not he should have chosen a more financially secure path, and how he has dealt with his “dream” turning into an ongoing nightmare as he realizes one bad decision could unravel all that he has earned. You know, actual “economic anxiety.” Hundreds of thousands of Americans grapple with these issues every day, and struggle to get ahead of their payments and not have their debt drown out their chance at economic stability. Michael’s essays could not be more relevant. From the New York Times bestselling author of I Can’t Date Jesus, which Vogue called “a piece of personal and cultural storytelling that is as fun as it is illuminating,” comes a wry and insightful essay collection that explores the financial and emotional cost of chasing your dreams.

Renowned for his eloquent Americana style, engaging live shows, and off-the-cuff clever observations, John Craigie carries on the legacy of classic singer-songwriters, while blazing a trail of his own. Recently, that trail twisted and turned into new territory for the Portland, OR performer who The Stranger appropriately dubbed, “the lovechild of John Prine and Mitch Hedberg.” His music speaks loud to both audiences and fellow artists. Todd Snider notably hand-delivered a gift on-stage, and Chuck Norris has sent fan mail. His fifth full-length album No Rain, No Rose boasted two collaborations with Gregory Alan Isakov, namely “Highway Blood” and “I Am California.” Both quickly cracked One Million Spotify streams and counting as his knack for a captivating narrative and rustic aural palettes powered the 13-track offering together.