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Upcoming Shows

THU, MAR 5

Hari Kondabolu, Sarah Scoles, Carmen Lagala, and Angelica Garcia!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

Comedian Hari Kondabolu is probably the smartest person you’ll laugh at this year. Why? Because he earned a Masters in Human Rights from the London School of Economics and worked as an immigrant rights organizer in Seattle. Thanks to that, his comedy is a complex blend of social commentary, honest personal experience, and trenchant political wit. His new Netflix standup special “Warn Your Relatives” came out this year, he was named one of Variety’s “Top 10 Comics to Watch,” and his critically-acclaimed documentary “The Problem with Apu” has been making waves since 2017. Sit down and get ready to be taken to school by the brainiest comedian around.

Sarah Scoles is all about identifying the unidentifiable. Her new book, “They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers” is an anthropological look at the UFO community, told through first-person experiences with researchers as they pursue what they see as a solvable mystery. She explores the community itself as well as what it reflects about the politics and culture of the world around them. Scoles is a science journalist, the author of the book “Making Contact,” a contributing writer at Wired, and a contributing editor at Popular Science. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Smithsonian, The Washington Post, Scientific American, and others. Scoles formerly worked at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the location of the first-ever SETI project. If you believe the truth is out there, then the writing of Sarah Scoles is your first contact.

Standup comedian Carmen Lagala has a killer sense of humor. Her versatile style is matched by her content, as she shifts easily between one-liners and stories about everything from serial killers to mittens made out of her dead dog. Lagala has been featured on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” Comedy Central's digital platform, touring the country headlining shows and festivals as well as regularly opening for Hari Kondabolu. Originally from Vermont, she moved to New York City in 2014 where she quickly became a favorite on indie shows, and most recently was crowned the winner of 2019's New York Comedy Club contest. When it comes to dark, dirty, and playful comedy, Carmen Lagala kills.

Angelica Garcia is proud to show off her roots. With Mexican and Salvadoran connections outside of Los Angeles, Garcia has spent the last several years creating a second family for herself within the welcoming community of Richmond, VA. She’s released two new songs with Richmond-based label Spacebomb Records: “It Doesn’t Hinder Me,” a song about pride in her background that combines pop and Southern rock, and “Karma the Knife,” a Reaggeaton-meets-dance hall anthem. Garcia’s indie pop music creates her own version of cool by weaving her personal experiences into her infectious sound. With new music coming in 2020, Angelica Garcia is an artist who knows who she is and where she came from – and we’re excited to go wherever she takes us next.

 

THU, MAR 12

Demi Adejuyigbe, Sierra Crane Murdoch, Samantha Crain + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Demi Adejuyigbe is an electric personality. A writer, comedian, and performer known for being a co-host of the popular podcasts “Gilmore Guys” and “Punch Up The Jam,” he first found an audience on Vine creating comedy under the name “Electrolemon.” Adejuyigbe took his comedy music clips to Twitter and YouTube, where he found even more fans for his recurring annual video of him dancing to the song “September,” by Earth, Wind & Fire, and creating “rejected theme songs” for movies and shows like “Succession.” Adejuyigbe is now a writer for NBC’s hit philosophically-minded sitcom “The Good Place” as well as “The Late Late Show with James Corden.” For smart, absurd, and electric comedy takes, Demi Adejuyigbe is your new favorite follow.

Sierra Crane Murdoch, a journalist based in the American West, has written for The Atlantic, The New Yorker online, Virginia Quarterly Review, Orion, and High Country News. She has held fellowships from Middlebury College and from the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first book, "Yellow Bird," is the gripping true story of a murder on an Indian reservation, and the unforgettable Arikara woman who becomes obsessed with solving it—an urgent work of literary journalism and was called "an impressive debut that serves as an eye-opening view of both the oil economy and Native American affairs" by Kirkus Reviews.

Musician and songwriter Samantha Crain is in a rebuilding phase. Her new LP, “A Small Death,” grew out of the Oklahoma-based artist confronting decades of grief, trauma, and physical pain that left her barely able to perform or play an instrument. That experience led her to a new beginning and a sense of reconstruction. “A Small Death” is the Chocktaw-American Crain’s sixth LP following the release of 2017’s “You Had Me At Goodbye.” She won two NAMMYs (Native American Music Awards) in 2009, the Indigenous Music Award for Best Rock Album in 2019, and has toured with a range of artists including The Avett Brothers, Neutral Milk Hotel, Brandi Carlile, The Mountain Goats, Josh Ritter, First Aid Kit, Deer Tick and more. Samantha Crain’s new beginning builds on all she’s done before, as her evocative imagery and powerful vocals shine on her latest project.

THU, APR 2

Cameron Esposito, Mikki Kendall, Jon Mooallem, and Dude York!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

Cameron Esposito is a Los Angeles-based comic, actor, and writer. Cameron’s career has spanned everything from big-budget films to Sundance indies to animation. She costarred in and cocreated the much-lauded Take My Wife, now on Starz, has written for the New York Times, and has appeared as herself on TV, podcasts, and web series alike. Cameron hosts a popular interview podcast, Queery with Cameron Esposito, and her recent hit comedy special, Rape Jokes, raised almost $100,000 for rape crisis intervention. This March, Cameron is adding author to her resume as she releases her first book SAVE YOURSELF, a memoir that tackles sexuality, gender, and equality – and how her Catholic upbringing prepared her for a career as an outspoken lesbian comedian.

Mikki Kendall is a writer, speaker, and blogger whose work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Guardian, TIME, Salon, Ebony, Essence, and elsewhere. An accomplished public speaker, she has discussed race, feminism, violence in Chicago, tech, pop culture, and social media on NPR's Tell Me More, Al Jazeera's The Listening Post, BBC Women's Hour, Huffington Post Live, as well as at universities across the country. In 2017, she was awarded Best Food Essay from the Association of Food Journalists for her essay on hot sauce, Jim Crow, and Beyoncé. She co-edited the Locus nominated anthology Hidden Youth, and is part of the Hugo-nominated team of editors at Fireside Magazine. A veteran, she lives in Chicago with her family.

Jon Mooallem is a longtime writer at large with The New York Times Magazine and a contributor to numerous other radio shows and magazines, including This American Life and Wired. His first book, Wild Ones was chosen as a notable book of the year by The New York Times Book Review, The New Yorker, NPR’s Science Friday and Canada's National Post, among others. He tours frequently with Pop-Up Magazine, a live magazine performed on stage, and has collaborated on music and storytelling projects with members of the Decemberists. He’s also the creator of the WALKING podcast, which—much to everyone’s surprise, especially his—was named a best podcast of the year by the AV Club and one of New York Magazine’s 100 podcasts worth listening to.

You are going to fall for the music of Seattle trio Dude York. On their second full-length album, “Falling,” the pop-punk band uses their impossibly catchy and emotive songs to explore the ways that falling can be both a cause of ruin and a cause of joy. Dude York’s sound feels perfectly at home sandwiched between Jimmy Eat World and Third Eye Blind, while still sounding utterly their own. A line of nostalgia runs through their newest album as the songs investigate the deep ties we have to the pop culture that defined our youth. By playing with tropes of romantic relationships, the trio of Peter Richards, Claire England, and Andrew Hall have created a record that feels like a love letter to the alternative radio of yesteryear while managing to stay uniquely singular. So let yourself fall into the unbridled joy of Dude York’s music – they’ll be there to catch you.

THU, APR 16

Daniel Mallory Ortberg + Meghan Daum, Barry Sonnenfeld, Ruthie Foster + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

 

Daniel Ortberg is a poetic yeller. As the cofounder of beloved literary humor site The Toast and the current dispenser of advice for Slate’s popular “Dear Prudence” column, Ortberg has been yelling on the internet for over a decade now – and people are listening.Ortberg is back with his new book “Something That Will Shock and Discredit You.” The witty and clever collection of essays and cultural observations spans pop culture – from the endearingly popular to the staggeringly obscure. Ortberg is also the New York Times bestselling author of “Texts from Jane Eyre” and “The Merry Spinster.”

Meghan Daum is writing toward the root of the problem. In her new book, “The Problem with Everything,” the author, essayist, and opinion columnist tackles our current culture wars and grapples with our country’s most seemingly intractable problems. She’s the author of five other books, most recently “The Unspeakable: And Other Subjects of Discussion,” which won the 2015 PEN Center USA Award for creative nonfiction. She has contributed to numerous magazines, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, and Vogue and received Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. With her signature clear-eyed, honest prose, Meghan Daum is a problem-solver at work.

Barry Sonnenfeld is neurotic when it comes to making incredible films. The filmmaker and writer, who broke into the industry as the cinematographer on the Coen Brothers' first three films, was also the director of photography on “Throw Mamma from the Train,” “Big,” “When Harry Met Sally,” and “Misery.” He made his directorial debut with “The Addams Family” in 1991, and went on to direct a number of films including “Addams Family Values,” “Get Shorty,” and the first three “Men in Blacks.” His television credits include “Pushing Daisies,” for which he won an Emmy, and Netflix's “A Series of Unfortunate Events.” His new book, “Barry Sonnenfeld, Call Your Mother: Memoirs of a Neurotic Filmmaker,” is an outrageous and hilarious tale of traveling through life with the motto: “Regret the Past. Fear the Present. Dread the Future." You’ve long seen life through Barry Sonnenfeld’ eyes on the screen – now take it in on the page.

Ruthie Foster has always undeniably marched to the beat of her own drum. From the small rural town of Gause, Texas, her vocal talent was elevated in worship services at her community church as she drew influence from legendary acts like Mavis Staples and Aretha Franklin. Along the way, Foster developed a unique sound unable to be contained within a single genre. She served in the Navy, walked away from a major recording deal when she felt it wouldn’t upload her individuality, and moved back to Texas to immerse herself in the Austin music scene. Described by Rolling Stone as “pure magic to watch and hear,” and nominated for Best Blues Album at the Grammy three times in a row, Foster is now on her sixth album – “Joy Comes Back,” which served as musical therapy for her as she split a household and custody of her child. Ruthie Foster’s mix of blues, folk, soul, rock, and gospel is undeniably hers, and she brings a whole lot more than a drum to the party.

THU, APR 30

Veronica Roth + Bonnie Tsui + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Veronica Roth is taking the narrative of “the chosen one” and catapulting it into the future. In “Chosen Ones,” her first novel for adults, she upends the trope by following a group of five people… ten years after they saved the world as teenagers. Roth is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of the “Divergent” series, which has sold over 32 million copies worldwide, and her first foray into adult fiction makes it crystal clear why readers choose her work.

Bonnie Tsui’s new book will make your head swim – in a good way. “Why We Swim” has been called “a fascinating and beautifully written love letter to water” by Rebecca Skloot. In it, Tsui examines why humans are so drawn to water despite not being natural swimmers. A longtime contributor to the New York Times and California Sunday Magazine, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Press Foundation Fellowship. Her last book, “American Chinatown: A People’s History of Five Neighborhoods,” won the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature and was a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller. When she’s not writing, Tsui swims and surfs in the Bay Area.

THU, MAY 14

Sopan Deb + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Sopan Deb has spun the pains and silences of family into heartbreaking yet humorous gold. In his new memoir “Missed Connections: Meeting the Immigrant Parents Who Raised Me,” Deb chronicles his literal and emotional journeys to reconnect with his father in India and his mother in New Jersey. Battling years of silence, Deb writes beautifully about the process of forgiveness, building bridges, and creating a new sort of family going forward. A writer for The New York Times as well as a standup comedian, Deb’s experience covering the Trump presidential campaign for CBS spurred him into wanting to reconnect with his family. He won an Edward R. Murrow award for a documentary he produced for The Boston Globe called “Larger Than Life,” which told the story about the NBA Hall of Famer Bill Russell’s complicated relationship with the city of Boston. Deb’s writing uses humor to crack open our hearts - and help us explore how to go forward with those we love most.

THU, MAY 28

Phuc Tran + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Phuc Tran’s life has been shaped and saved by art. A high school Latin teacher for more than 20 years, he simultaneously established himself as a highly sought-after tattooer in the Northeast. His coming-of-age memoir “Sigh, Gone” is for anyone who’s ever felt like they didn’t belong. The book is an irreverent, funny, and moving tale of displacement and assimilation woven together with poignant themes from beloved works of classic literature. He currently tattoos at and owns Tsunami Tattoo in Portland, Maine, where he lives with his family. Tran’s new book vividly illustrates the essential role art and language can play in the journey of self-discovery.

THU, JUN 11

with Michael Arceneaux, John Craigie, + more!
Venue: Alberta Rose Theatre
Doors: 6:30pm
Show: 7:30pm

Michael Arceneaux is a Houston-bred, Howard University-educated writer currently living in Harlem. Covering issues related to culture, sexuality, religion, race, and Beyoncé, Michael has written for Complex, Essence, The Guardian, New York Magazine, the New York Times, The Root, and many other publications. Additionally, he has lent his commentary to such outlets as MSNBC, NPR, SiriusXM, VH1, and Viceland. I Don’t Want to Die Poor (on sale April 7, 2020) is an unforgettable and relatable examination about what it’s like leading a life that often feels out of your control. But in Michael’s voice that’s “as joyful as he is shrewd” (BuzzFeed), these razor-sharp essays will still manage to make you laugh and remind you that you’re not alone in this often intimidating journey. Michael has never shied away from discussing his struggles with debt. In I Don’t Want to Die Poor he reveals the extent to which it has an impact on every facet of his life. It has had a huge influence on how he dates, how he seeks medical care, how he wrestles with the question of whether or not he should have chosen a more financially secure path, and how he has dealt with his “dream” turning into an ongoing nightmare as he realizes one bad decision could unravel all that he has earned. You know, actual “economic anxiety.” Hundreds of thousands of Americans grapple with these issues every day, and struggle to get ahead of their payments and not have their debt drown out their chance at economic stability. Michael’s essays could not be more relevant. From the New York Times bestselling author of I Can’t Date Jesus, which Vogue called “a piece of personal and cultural storytelling that is as fun as it is illuminating,” comes a wry and insightful essay collection that explores the financial and emotional cost of chasing your dreams.

Renowned for his eloquent Americana style, engaging live shows, and off-the-cuff clever observations, John Craigie carries on the legacy of classic singer-songwriters, while blazing a trail of his own. Recently, that trail twisted and turned into new territory for the Portland, OR performer who The Stranger appropriately dubbed, “the lovechild of John Prine and Mitch Hedberg.” His music speaks loud to both audiences and fellow artists. Todd Snider notably hand-delivered a gift on-stage, and Chuck Norris has sent fan mail. His fifth full-length album, No Rain, No Rose boasted two collaborations with Gregory Alan Isakov, namely “Highway Blood” and “I Am California.” Both quickly cracked One Million Spotify streams and counting as his knack for a captivating narrative and rustic aural palettes powered the 13-track offering together.